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Great Crested Grebe
(Podiceps cristatus)



Great Crested Grebe

General description

The Great Crested Grebe is the largest member of the grebe family found in the Old World, with some larger species residing in the Americas.

The adults are unmistakable in summer with head and neck decorations. In winter, this is whiter than most grebes, with white above the eye, and a pink bill.

The young are distinctive because their heads are striped black and white. They lose these markings when they become adults.

Name & classification

Scientific name:
Podiceps cristatus

Common names:
Great Crested Grebe (English)
Kuifkopdobbertjie (Afrikaans)

Roberts VII english name:
Great Crested Grebe

Roberts VII scientific name:
Podiceps cristatus

Family:
Grebes (Podicipedidae)

Further information

Length:
50cm

Weight:
600g

Diet:
The Great Crested Grebe feeds mainly on fish, but also small crustaceans, insects and small frogs.

They are excellent swimmers and divers, and pursue fish prey underwater.

Nesting:
The Great Crested Grebe has an elaborate mating display. Like all grebes, it nests on the water's edge, since its legs are set relatively far back and it is thus unable to walk very well. Usually two eggs are laid, and the fluffy, striped young grebes are often carried on the adult's back.

In a clutch of two or more hatchlings, male and female grebes will each identify their 'favourites', which they alone will care for and teach.

Unusually, young grebes are capable of swimming and diving almost at hatching. The adults teach these skills to their young by carrying them on their back and diving, leaving the chicks to float on the surface; they then re-emerge a few feet away so that the chicks may swim back onto them.

Natural distribution:
Generally sparse but in a few areas it is locally common and resident particularly in the Western Cape, Gauteng and parts of the Free State.

Habitat:
Mostly permanent deep water bodies.

Notes:
This species was hunted almost to extinction in the United Kingdom in the 19th century for its head plumes, which were used to decorate hats and ladies' undergarments. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds was set up to help protect this species, which is again a common sight.

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